Principals behind PC operation in any windowing system
As you will find, direct parallels can be drawn between How Microsoft versions and Linux versions operate.
 This means the skills learned in one system can be used on any system.

Open, New, Save, and Save_as...
Windows Open New  or Save / Save_as   early style

Windows Open New  or Save / Save_as  Windows 2K

Windows Open New  or Save / Save_as  Vista style

Linux Save_as as found in the program Kate in the Opensuse 11.1 distribution


 

  As can be seen from these examples of the pop-up windows for the new open save or save_as features in programs, there are striking similarities. In each case, the user has a means of choosing storage location, output file name and type, a means to navigate to the correct location, a viewing panel, and the all important action buttons to save or cancel.

  Apart from seeing some strange filenames that Windows familiar users see in Linux, there is really no difference.

Using Window control features of applications

  The top of Windows application windows usually always contain a Title line, a menu line which drops down to show options, and one or more rows of tools called toolbars.
   In many cases, as you move your mouse over tools their purpose shows in a pop-up balloon. You use the menus and tools to control the application.



 

  Linux is no different in how it operates. Each window has a title line, menu line, and one or more toolbar lines. You can turn or off tool tips (balloons) in most applications and you control your application using the menu options and tools.

The system Menu and taskbar
   In Windows versions, the symbol in the bottom left corner of the screen is usually where you go to access all your applications. With some due diligence you can modify how the task bar displays and what your list of applications will be. Shown here is the classic view but Windows Vista and Windows 7 also have the modern view.

  It's your choice. Classic view opens program groups to the right as shown. Modern view places new lists over top of the current list which saves desktop space but requires more mouse action to move back and forth through the menu's.

   Of note is that applications are generally organized by application vender not by an application Classification. Thusly, unless you intervene, you end up with folder's like Accessories, Ulead photo, ZoneLabs, Picasa, etc. You must then remember what the purposes are for. There is no short purpose descriptions or automated classifications. If your bored you can reclassify them yourself.

  In Linux, the symbol in the bottom left corner of the screen is usually where you go to access all your applications. You have full control over where your system bar displays at and how your list of applications are organized. Shown here is the Classic view but there is also a modern view that predates but parallels the Vista look.

  It's your choice. Classic view opens program groups to the right as shown. Modern view places new lists over top of the current list which saves desktop space but requires more mouse action to move back and forth through the menu's.

  Of note is that Linux knows not only where to place newly added programs but also provides a short description of what the application does and in some cases identifies when there is special difference. Notice: the entry KOffice Workspace/KDE3 not only tells you that it is an Office suite but also that it is the KDE3 version not the KDE4 version which is currently installed.